That Number Agreement

A number change is created when a pronoun does not match its predecessor. Changes in numbers often occur when the precursor is a single noun or an indeterminate pronoun that includes both sexes: Canadian, person, person, person, person, person, person, person, person, person, person, etc. Modern English doesn`t have much correspondence, although it`s there. Swahili, like all other Bantu languages, has many nominatory classes. The verbs must correspond in class with their subjects and objects, and the adjectives with the nouns they describe. For example: Kitabu kimoja kitatosha (One book will suffice), Mchungwa mmoja utatosha (An orange will be enough), Chungwa moya litatosha (An orange will be enough). In addition to the pre-name words of the variables listed above, there are a few immutable words that the noun must accept. All words except any nountitive (and therefore countable) as well as decimal numbers, z.B. 0.5 liter (see 67). Numbers in spoken English, #7). The rather common error in the use of a singular substrate according to an encrypted word is due, at least in part, to the fact that plurality is already visible in the meaning of the word digital, although the influence of the mother tongue may be an additional factor, since not all languages require a plural form according to a number.

Also keep in mind the agreement that has been shown to be also in the subjunctive mind. There is also unanimity in the number. For example: Vitabu viwili vitatosha (Two books will suffice), Michungwa miwili itatosha (Two orange trees will suffice), Machungwa mawili yatatosha (Two oranges will suffice). Note that some of the changes mentioned above are also (in the singular) when the following word begins with a vowel: the and become it there, you and the l, my will be my (as if the name would be masculine) and it will be this. The adjectives correspond in terms of sex and number with the nouns they change into French. As with verbs, chords are sometimes displayed only in spelling, as forms written with different modes of concordance are sometimes pronounced in the same way (z.B pretty, pretty); Although, in many cases, the final conssonann is pronounced in female forms, but in male forms (p.B.